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Buy diabetes treatment online

Diabetes is where your body struggles to control its levels of insulin. There are two types, and they can both provide barriers to everyday life.

Talk to us about your healthcare needs and we can advise you of which treatments can be right for you. Subscribe to Treated and receive your diabetes treatment as and when you need it.

Here’s what's included in the price:
Consultation
Answer a few questions about your health so we can get to know you better.
Free 24h delivery
Your treatment delivered in secure packaging, the very next day.
Aftercare
We’ll check in with you regularly to see how your treatment is going.
This page was medically reviewed by Dr Daniel Atkinson, GP Clinical Lead on August 02, 2022. Next review due on August 01, 2024.
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    Diabetes: Here's what we've got.
    Silver blister pack containing 10 capsules

    Eucreas Tablets

    Vildagliptin + Metformin

    Effective combination treatment for type 2 diabetes that comes in two doses.

    • Starting from £78.00
    Silver blister pack containing 10 small white round tablets

    Metformin

    Metformin

    Generic tablet that's available in two doses as well as an extended release form.

    • Starting from £20.00
    White and light blue Victoza injection pen with dose counter

    Victoza

    Liraglutide

    Injection treatment that increases your insulin production and lowers your risk of heart disease.

    • Starting from £160.00
    White blister pack containing 15 long tablets

    Janumet

    Sitagliptin + Metformin

    Twice daily combined tablet that lowers blood sugar and boosts insulin production.

    • Starting from £74.00
    Silver blister pack containing 14 round tablets

    Onglyza

    Saxagliptin

    Once daily tablet. Alternative to metformin that helps to regulate blood sugar.

    • Starting from £70.00
    Light blue auto injector pen with dose reader

    Ozempic

    Semaglutide

    Pre-filled injection for diabetes that also helps you lose weight. Once a week treatment.

    • Starting from £142.00

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    Some treatments can cause side effects

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    What is diabetes?

    Diabetes, also known as diabetes mellitus, is a chronic health problem that affects the body’s ability to produce insulin or use the blood sugar (or blood glucose) effectively.

    Blood sugar levels are regulated by a hormone called insulin which is produced by the beta cells of the pancreas. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into the cells where it’s needed.

    The pancreas plays a vital role in diabetes. If a person becomes diabetic, it means that the pancreas isn’t able to produce enough insulin required for the body or cells aren’t able to make proper use of the insulin produced.

    What types of Diabetes are there?

    Diabetes is broadly divided into: Type 1, Type 2 and Gestational Diabetes.

    Type 1 diabetes is a health condition in which your immune system destroys the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. So, they cannot produce any insulin. It usually occurs in children, teenagers and young people but can also occur at any age.

    Type 2 diabetes is a condition in which cells become insensitive to insulin and cannot make use of the blood sugar effectively. As a result, blood glucose levels go up. It’s milder and more common than type 1, but can lead to serious complications in your eyes, nerves, kidney and heart. In type 2 diabetes, there are two connected problems: your cells respond poorly to insulin, so can’t make use of the blood sugar effectively. And sometimes your pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin.

    Gestational diabetes is a health condition which occurs in pregnant women. During pregnancy, sometimes the body becomes insulin resistant and so blood sugar levels rise. This type of diabetes usually goes away after birth.

    Gestational diabetes is of two classes. Women with A1 class are able to control it with the help of proper diet and regular exercise. While those with A2 class have to take medicines or insulin shots.

    There’s also a form of diabetes known as ‘Latent Autoimmune Diabetes of Adulthood’ (or LADA) which is sometimes informally called ‘diabetes 1.5’. This is currently classified as a form of type 1 diabetes, but shares similarities with type 2 – hence the ‘1.5’. Research is currently being undertaken to find out what seems to make it different from both type 1 and 2 diabetes.

    Who gets diabetes?

    Type 1 diabetes can affect anyone at any time, but type 2 diabetes is usually acquired later in life. You are more likely to get type 2 diabetes if you’re over 40 (or over 25 if you’re south Asian), have a family history of diabetes, or are overweight or obese. Type 1 diabetes is thought to be caused by an autoimmune reaction that destroys the cells in the pancreas that make insulin, called beta cells. This process can go on for months or years before any symptoms appear. Some people have certain genes that make them more likely to develop type 1 diabetes.

    Gestational diabetes happens when your blood sugar gets too high during pregnancy, and your body can’t make enough insulin to regulate it. Like type 2 diabetes, you’re at a higher risk of getting gestational diabetes if you’re overweight or have a family history of diabetes.

    How common is diabetes?

    A 2016 study suggested that 9% of men and 7.9% of women worldwide could be diagnosed as having diabetes: a number that has risen by 28.5% since 1980. So it’s common, and it’s on the rise. This is generally thought to be because the world’s population is getting older and heavier.

    Type 2 diabetes is more common than type 1, with an estimated 90% of diabetes sufferers having type 2, but both are for life. But where type 1 is unavoidable, it’s possible to minimise the risk of getting type 2 diabetes by living a healthy lifestyle. This type is the main reason for diabetes becoming more common.

    In the case of gestational diabetes, it’s estimated that 2%-10% of yearly pregnancies are affected by it.

    Medically reviewed by
    Dr Daniel Atkinson
    GP Clinical Lead
    on August 02, 2022.
    Meet Daniel  
    Daniel
    This page was medically reviewed by Dr Daniel Atkinson, GP Clinical Lead on August 02, 2022. Next review due on August 01, 2024.

    How we source info.

    When we present you with stats, data, opinion or a consensus, we’ll tell you where this came from. And we’ll only present data as clinically reliable if it’s come from a reputable source, such as a state or government-funded health body, a peer-reviewed medical journal, or a recognised analytics or data body. Read more in our editorial policy.

    What causes diabetes?

    The cause of type 1 diabetes is often genetic. If any of your parents or siblings have type 1 diabetes, you might get it as well.

    Besides this, environmental factors, like viruses or other autoimmune disorders like Vitiligo or Graves’ disease may also cause it.

    You might get type 2 diabetes due to genetics, lifestyle disorders or certain health conditions. If you are obese or overweight and lead a lifestyle with a lot of stress and no physical activity or exercise, you might develop type 2 diabetes mellitus. High blood pressure, low levels of “good cholesterol” high-density lipoprotein (HDL), high levels of triglycerides in the blood, or a family history of diabetes might also increase your chances of getting diabetes. 

    Gestational diabetes is another factor. If you had gestational diabetes during your pregnancy, you are at a higher risk of having type 2 diabetes.

    What are the symptoms of diabetes?

    The symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes include extreme thirst, excessive hunger, sudden weight loss, frequent urination, tiredness, frequent infections of skin, gums, vaginal or urinary tract, slow-healing sores and blurry vision.

    Many people, however, can have type 2 diabetes without realising. This is because the symptoms can be mild, and don’t necessarily make you feel unwell. 

    Can diabetes lead to other problems?

    If left untreated and uncontrolled, diabetes can lead to a range of problems. These problems can be caused gradually, so it’s important to get an early diagnosis where possible, and keep  good control over your blood sugar levels.

    Complications of untreated diabetes can include: cardiovascular disease, nerve, kidney and eye damage, skin conditions, Alzheimers and depression.

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    What medications are there for diabetes?

    There are a range of different types of diabetes treatments which work to regulate your blood sugar levels.

    • Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors block the break-down of starches in your intestine and slow the breakdown of some sugars. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors should be taken with food.
    • Biguanides lower your blood sugar levels by decreasing the amount of glucose produced by the liver and makes muscle tissue more sensitive to insulin so glucose can be absorbed.
    • Metformin, a common diabetes treatment, is a type of biguanide which is usually taken twice a day.
    • Bile acid sequestrants lower both your cholesterol and blood sugar.
    • Dopamine-2 agonists increase the activity of your dopamine receptors, which increases your sensitivity to insulin.
    • DPP-4 inhibitors prevent the breakdown of GLP-1, a naturally occurring substance in your body that reduces your blood sugar levels – but is usually broken down very quickly.
    • Meglitinides are usually taken before each of your three meals, and work by stimulating your beta cells to release insulin.
    • SGLT2 Inhibitors increase glucose levels in your urine by blocking glucose reabsorption in the kidney.
    • Sulfonylureas stimulate the beta cells in your pancreas to produce more insulin, and they’re usually taken twice a day before meals.
    • TZDs help insulin work better in your muscle fat and reduce glucose production in the liver.

    Sometimes you might need to take a combination of some of these treatments, and other times, for instance if you have type 2 diabetes, you might be able to regulate your condition just with a change in diet. These treatments can often be more or less suitable for different people depending on their health needs and condition. Our clinician will be able to advise you of which type of treatment might be best for you once you’ve talked to us about your health.

    Is there a ‘best’ treatment for diabetes?

    The ‘best’ treatment for diabetes depends on which type of diabetes you have. The most commonly used  treatment for type 1 diabetes is usually the use of an insulin pump or injector, frequent checks of blood sugar, and diet monitoring.

    Whereas the best treatment for type 2 diabetes is generally leading a better lifestyle – so more exercise and less sugary foods – as well as using medications or insulin.

    If you’re unsure of which treatment can be best for you, talk to us about your health and our clinical team can tell you what the best options are.

    Does diabetes always need treatment?

    No, diabetes doesn’t always need treatment. Some people with type 2 diabetes are able to keep their blood sugar levels under control with a good diet and regular exercise. But this will depend on the severity of your condition; many diabetics still require medications, insulin shots, or a combination of both.

    Consulting our clinician and getting advice for your diabetes problem is recommended. They will be able to look at your general health and suggest whether you need diabetes treatment, and which one could be right for you.

    FAQ: Diabetes

    Have something specific you want to know? Search our info below, or ask our experts a question if you can’t find what you’re looking for.

    Why should I buy Trulicity online with Treated?

    Answer:
    Finding the diabetes treatment that works for you can be tough. That’s why, with tailored advice and proven treatments, we’ll help you find what suits you best.

    We’ll send your treatment straight to your door, and if you’ve got any questions or concerns at any time, you can simply log in to your account and send us a message. We’ll check in with you to see how your treatment’s going, and send you a handy reminder when it’s going to run out. So you can conveniently re-order, hassle-free.

    Do I need a prescription for Trulicity?

    Answer:
    Yes, you need a prescription for Trulicity. This is because it’s not a suitable treatment for everyone, and your condition will need to be monitored whilst you’re using it to make sure it continues to be safe and effective for you.

    Does Trulicity cause hair loss?

    Answer:
    Although some people have claimed that Trulicity has caused hair loss for them, there’s no scientific evidence that this is the case. There is, however, evidence to suggest that having diabetes can cause hair loss.

    Is Trulicity similar to any other treatments?

    Answer:
    Other GLP-1 agonists include:

    • liraglutide (sold under the brand name Victoza)

    • exenatide (Byetta, Bydureon)

    • lixisenatide (Lyxumia)

    • semaglutide (Ozempic)


    Semaglutide is the only one of these which is available as an oral (tablet) treatment, which is called Rybelsus. The rest are pre-filled injections.

    Ozempic and Bydureon are also once-a-week treatments, whereas Victoza, Byetta and Lyxumia need to be injected daily.

    How is Trulicity different from other treatments for diabetes?

    Answer:
    Diabetes treatments come in a range of different types. Typically you’ll be prescribed metformin to start off with, unless it’s not suitable for you. If metformin on its own doesn’t work to control your blood sugar, you’ll move onto a different type of treatment, which will probably be used alongside metformin. The most common types of treatment for diabetes are typically: DPP-4 inhibitors, SGLT-2 inhibitors, glitazones or sulfonylureas.

    Each type of treatment has a different mode of action in order to lower your blood sugar, and it can sometimes take a bit of trial and error to find the one that works best for you.

    Trulicity differs from most diabetes treatments in that it’s a once-a-week injection treatment, whereas most other diabetes treatments come in the form of daily tablets. You might find it better to use a weekly injectable like Trulicity if you struggle to swallow tablets, or find it inconvenient to take daily treatment.

    Why should I buy Trajenta online with Treated?

    Answer:
    We’ll deliver your essential medication straight to your door, without hassle, once you’ve talked to us about your health. Our expert clinicians will be on hand whenever you need them to answer any questions or concerns you may have, and we’ll be in touch when your prescription is due to expire - making it easy to re-order and re-deliver your treatment.

    Order your diabetes treatment with us for personalised healthcare that suits your life.

    Do I need a prescription for Trajenta?

    Answer:
    Yes. Like all type-2 diabetes treatments, you need a prescription for Trajenta. This is because it’s not a safe and suitable treatment for everyone, and your blood sugar levels will need to be tested every once in a while to make sure that it’s still working properly for you.

    Is Trajenta similar to any other treatments?

    Answer:
    Other DPP-4 inhibitors include Januvia, which uses the active ingredient sitagliptin, Galvus (vildagliptin) and Onglyza (saxagliptin).

    Each of these treatments will work in your body in slightly different ways due to their differing active ingredients. As a result, you might find that different DPP-4 inhibitors work better or worse for you depending on how your body responds to them.

    Why should I buy Tolbutamide online with Treated?

    Answer:
    We’ll send you your treatment quickly, discreetly and securely once you’ve talked to us about your health. We know that navigating your diabetes treatment can be a frustrating experience, but our clinicians are on hand to help make the experience a little more hassle-free.

    You’ll be able to log into your account and send us a message at any time if you have any questions or concerns, and we’ll send you a handy reminder when your prescription’s due to expire. So you won’t have to worry about running out of the treatment you need.

    How is Trajenta different from other diabetes treatments?

    Answer:
    Type-2 diabetes treatments come in a range of different types, Most are tablets, but some can be injected, too. The most commonly prescribed ‘first-line’ treatment for type-2 diabetes (after diet and exercise) is metformin - which works in different ways to stop your body making as much glucose and to help your cells use insulin better.

    Metformin isn’t always effective or suitable for everyone, though. And sometimes people need to take different or additional treatments to help them control their blood sugar. Some of these other treatments, aside from DPP-4 inhibitors like Trajenta, include:

    • Sulfonylureas: which work to increase your insulin secretion

    • GLP-1 agonists: which typically come as injections

    • SGLT-2 inhibitors: which allow more glucose to be excreted in your urine

    • Pioglitazone: which helps your body to use insulin better.


    Finding the right treatment(s) for you can take time. Sometimes you’ll need to cycle through a few different ones before you find treatments that work best for your health and your life.

    Do I need a prescription for Tolbutamide?

    Answer:
    Yes, you need a prescription for Tolbutamide. This is because it’s not a suitable treatment for everyone, and your condition will need to be monitored while you’re using it to make sure that it carries on being safe and effective for you.

    How is Tolbutamide different from other treatments for diabetes?

    Answer:
    Diabetes treatments can come in a range of different types, each of which will work slightly differently to lower your blood sugar. The ‘first-line’ treatment for diabetes is typically metformin, which works by helping your body to use insulin better. But Sulfonylureas like Tolbutamide might then be prescribed to you if metformin on its own hasn’t worked or isn’t suitable for you.

    Other types of treatments can include DPP-4 inhibitors, SGLT-2 inhibitors and glitazones. Typically, diabetes treatments involve a bit of trial-and-error, and sometimes a treatment that originally works well might become less effective over time and you’ll need to switch to another treatment or try a few different types at once (or combination treatments).

    Is Tolbutamide similar to any other treatments?

    Answer:
    There are other sulfonylureas you can get which will have a similar mode of action to Tolbutamide. Tolbutamide is a ‘first generation’ sulfonylurea - which means that it’s been around for a while, and newer ‘second generation’ drugs have since been licensed for use.

    Tolbutamide isn’t typically prescribed as frequently as newer treatments because while it’s more potent, there’s evidence to suggest that it’s more likely to give you side effects. If you’re prescribed this treatment, though, it’s because a clinician has decided that the benefits it’ll bring to your health are greater than any risks.

    Why should I buy Synjardy online with Treated?

    Answer:
    Finding a diabetes treatment that works best for you can be tough, that’s why we provide tailored, expert aftercare when you get your treatment with us. Your medication will be sent to you promptly, securely and discreetly, and we’ll check in with you once you’ve started using it to see how you’re getting on.

    If you’ve got any questions or concerns at any time, just log into your account and send one of our experts a message. We’ll take the stress out of your treatment, so you can prioritise your health.

    Do I need a prescription for Synjardy?

    Answer:
    Yes, you need a prescription for Synjardy. This is because it isn’t suitable for everyone, and your condition will need to be monitored whilst you’re taking it to make sure that it’s still safe and effective for you.

    Is Synjardy similar to any other treatments?

    Answer:
    Vokanamet and Xigduo are similar treatments to Synjardy, in that they both contain a combination of SGLT-2 inhibitor and metformin. But where Synjardy contains the SGLT-2 inhibitor, empagliflozin, Vokanamet contains canagliflozin and Xigduo contains dapagliflozin. This means that although all these treatments have a similar mode of action, you might find that each treatment might be more or less suitable or effective for you.

    Synjardy isn’t available as a generic treatment. This means that the combination of active ingredients in it are unique to this treatment, and there aren’t any other treatments that will work in quite the same way to lower your blood sugar. You can get the individual components of Synjardy as separate tablets, but you might find it more convenient and cost-effective to take them as a combined tablet.

    Which dose of Synjardy should I use?

    Answer:
    The dose of Synjardy that you’re prescribed will depend on any existing treatments that you’re taking and your health needs. So, for instance, you’ll likely be prescribed a low dose of Synjardy if you have any kidney problems. Our clinician will recommend the best dose for you once you’ve talked to us about your health.

    How is Synjardy different from other treatments for diabetes?

    Answer:
    Diabetes treatments come in a range of different forms, each with a different mode of action to lower your blood sugar. Metformin is usually the ‘first line’ treatment for type-2 diabetes, which can also be prescribed to you if you don’t yet have diabetes but are at risk of developing it. If metformin doesn’t work to control your blood sugar, or it’s not suitable for you, then you might be prescribed an additional or alternative type of treatment that will work in a different way.

    Other types of treatment can include sulfonylureas, DPP-4 inhibitors and meglitinides, all of which work to increase your insulin secretion. The two active ingredients in Synjardy don’t affect your insulin levels, but instead lower your blood glucose levels in other ways.

    Do I need a prescription for Qtern?

    Answer:
    Yes, you need a prescription for Qtern. This is because it isn’t suitable for everyone, and your condition will need to be monitored whilst you’re taking it.

    Why should I buy Qtern online with Treated?

    Answer:
    When you get your diabetes medication with us, you’ll be getting a proven treatment sent straight to your door, as well as expert aftercare from our clinical team. Just talk to us about your health and we’ll offer suitable treatments for you alongside tailored advice on how to get the best out of them.

    We’ll check in on you to make sure everything’s going okay with your treatment, and if you’ve got any questions or concerns at any time all you need to do is log into your account and send us a message. Finding the best diabetes treatment for you can be tough, but ordering with Treated helps take away the hassle to help you live your life.
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    Our average rating based on 3270 reviews.

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    4.8

    Our average rating based on 3270 reviews.